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Our Group

Primary Investigator

JBakerJennifer L Baker, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Research Group Leader in Lifecourse Epidemiology
email: Jennifer.Lyn.Baker(at)regionh.dk

I received my PhD in Nutrition from Cornell University. The focus of my research program is on the causes of and short- and long-term consequences of childhood body size and growth, with a particular emphasis on obesity. As the foundations for many diseases are established in early life, the totality of our work seeks to understand how body size and lifestyle factors across the lifespan influence the later risk of disease.

Graduate Students

LineKlingenHaugaardLine Klingen Haugaard, M.D.
Ph.D. student
email: Line.Klingen.Haugaard.01(at)regionh.dk

I obtained my medical degree from the University of Copenhagen and have completed initial training in paediatrics at Hvidovre Hospital. My clinical and scientific interest lies in the field of childhood obesity and growth and its health consequences. As a Ph.D. student, I aim to investigate if childhood body size and growth affects the risk of ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke later in life. My project is financed by the University of Copenhagen and the Danish Heart Association (n° 13-04-R95-A4441-22745).

kathrinemeyleKathrine Damm Meyle, MSc.
Ph.D. student
email: Kathrine.Damm.Meyle(at)regionh.dk

I have a B.Sc. and a M.Sc. in Molecular Biomedicine from the University of Copenhagen. In addition to the overall functional aspects of the human body, my education and research experiences have equipped me with knowledge of molecular mechanisms and events underlying the initiation and progression of human diseases. The main focus has been centered on topics such as metabolism, obesity and cancer, mainly malignant melanoma. My PhD project aims to unravel if increased childhood body size (assessed by weight, height, and body mass index (BMI)) is associated with a higher risk of developing malignant melanoma and renal cell cancer in adulthood.

Post-docs

Julie Aarestrup, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
email: Julie.Aarestrup(at)regionh.dk

I have a B.Sc. in Food Science and Technology and a M.Sc. in Human Nutrition, both from the University of Copenhagen. Subsequently, my research has been focused on cancer epidemiology, where I have investigated the association between different exposures and the risk of hormone-dependent cancers, which is a particular interest of mine. During my Ph.D. study I investigated the associations between childhood body size and growth and the risk of endometrial and prostate cancer in adulthood. I am currently working on early life risk factores for ovarian cancer.

Lise_20141209Lise Geisler Bjerregaard, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
email: Lise.Geisler.Bjerregaard(at)regionh.dk

I received my BSc, MSc and PhD degrees in Public Health Sciences from the University of Copenhagen. My research has concentrated on longitudinal studies of body weight. My scientific focus areas are the development of the obesity epidemic, developmental origins of obesity and related diseases with special focus on causes of childhood obesity, mainly infant feeding and infant growth studied in population-based studies. I work on the Childgrowth2cancer project, and I am also funded by the Danish Council for Independent Research | Medical Sciences (FSS). My project is studying associations between childhood body size, growth and the risk of prostate cancer and potential mediation through adult metabolic factors and body size.

Billede IPM_BWJBritt Wang Jensen, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
email: Britt.Wang.Jensen(at)regionh.dk

I have a MSc in Human Nutrition from University of Copenhagen and a PhD degree in Nutritional Epidemiology from University of Southern Denmark. My PhD was based on a Danish school-based intervention study and the main research areas were dietary intake in childhood, childhood obesity and the effect of school-based interventions on dietary intake. I am currently employed in the ChildGrowth2Cancer project as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow where I am examining the possible association between childhood body size and growth and the risk of colorectal cancer later in life.

Former members

Esther Zimmermann, Ph.D.

Michael Gamborg, Ph.D.